Event marketers are using the same technology as…Picasso?

George Bernard Shaw once said, “We don’t stop playing
because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing,” and these
are words that Doug Pouliot, owner of 
Boston Hand Light Painting, chooses
to live by. 

 

Light
painting photography is the process of manipulating a light source while a
camera’s shutter remains open for a few seconds/minutes longer than normal.
Either those being photographed, or a “Light
Ninja” camouflaged behind the subject(s), wield colorful light
sources to create simple or layered compositions. Pouliot’s company provides the service for parties, conferences, and other events. “The look on most people’s faces when they see what they’ve
created is often awe and amazement,” says Pouliot. “It’s like giving a child crayons or markers
for the first time, it’s truly wonderful to see.”

Though
you might not know it, light painting stretches all the way back to the late
Nineteenth Century. Original uses were not meant for pleasure but, rather, to
capture the physical expenditure of workers on the factory floor. Each stream
of of light indicated one movement by a worker: the more streams, the less
efficient. From its initial utilitarian use, artists began experimenting with
the technique and works began to pop-up by the likes of Man Ray, Pablo Picasso,
Salvador Dali, Gjon Mili and many others. 

So,
what does this mean for your event exactly?

Event
marketers choose light painting over a more traditional photo activation
because of its sheer uniqueness. According to Pouliot, event planners love
exposing their guests to something typically reserved for artists or those with
expensive photo equipment and software. “Light painting tends to lean
towards a young, hip, tech savvy crowd…perfect for any event that wants to
utilize color and texture.” Parties are always a great time for Pouliot
but light painting works best when it can accentuate guests sense
of camaraderie via mutual creativity. Corporate retreats, anyone?? 

Though
you might not be able to find a light painting studio on every corner, the
technology is available and out there if you look. Possibilities for branding
are only limited by one’s imagination. Perhaps you’d like logos on the printed
photos? Maybe you’d like to have the photos tweeted to your hashtag? Hell, make
a glow-in-the-dark logo of your company and give your guests lights corresponding
to the corporate color scheme. Get creative with your photographer and see what
you can come up with!

All too often event
marketers use the same bag of tricks and the same formula for events. Guests
often yearn for more than a DJ, a dance floor and a buffet. By making
an event more dynamic, unique and exciting you will provide guests with an
experience they aren’t likely to forget or find any place else. What makes this
technology successful is the same thing that makes events successful: interactivity.
When I asked Pouliot about an event goers experience with light painting he
explained, “It tends to make people feel rather than think,
bringing emotion to the forefront which, I believe, is a good thing.”

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