Worldata: Permission BTB E-Mail Lists Still Costliest

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Business-to-business e-mail lists continue to rise in price while consumer lists dropped slightly, according to an index released yesterday by Worldata, Boca Raton, FL.


The Worldata Fall 2004 List Price Index covers October 2003 to October 2004. It is grouped into list categories and compares costs per thousand names for the 12-month period.


The index shows permission-based BTB e-mail lists as the costliest, with an average base of $287/M in October 2004, up $8 from the $279/M average in October 2003.


Permission-based business-to-consumer e-mail lists had an average price of $170/M in October 2004, down $2 from an average of $172/M in October 2003. Permission-based BTB and consumer e-mail lists remain the two most costly list types.


Postal files also saw changes in average prices in the past year. The index shows that postal files in the database/master file category rose an average of $9/M in base price.


The firm added a category to the index. It is the public sector, and it includes lists in the areas of government and education. The average price per thousand for these types of lists was $136/M in October 2004.


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