USPS launches "green" Web site

Share this article:
USPS pushes back Intelligent Mail barcode implementation
USPS pushes back Intelligent Mail barcode implementation

The US Postal Service has launched a new Web site promoting the agency's eco-friendly products and services, as well as recommended “green” practices for mailers. 

The new Web site can be accessed at www.usps.com/green. The site, which went live on April 14, is divided into five sections: eco-friendly products and services, greening your mail, recycle, innovation and direct and green. The home page also features selected stamps released by the USPS in the past that promote nature and conservation.

The site also includes several links to various resources on the Direct Marketing Association's Web site, including DMAChoice, its free direct mail opt-out service, and its list of 15 eco-friendly business practices for direct marketers.

The USPS asked the DMA for permission to link to its materials, said Jerry Cerasale, SVP of government affairs for the DMA. “I see it as a benefit to mailers,” Cerasale said of the site. “They can help spread the word far beyond DMA members,” he said.

The USPS first started talking about launching a green site in October in order to highlight its eco-friendly Cradle to Cradle packaging, said Joyce Carrier, acting manager of advertising for USPS. “Then we realized that there might be other nuggets within the organization,” she continued.

Share this article:

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in Direct Mail

Delivered: Food Delivery Mailers

Delivered: Food Delivery Mailers

What's in our mailbox this month: Food delivery mailers. Which one's the tastiest?

Tracking Direct Mail Response in a Digital World

Tracking Direct Mail Response in a Digital World

It's essential to understand how direct mail delivers website traffic and impact conversions.

Help Out the USPS—and Yourself—by Amping Up Your Direct Mail

Help Out the USPS—and Yourself—by Amping Up Your ...

Direct mail is far from obsolete, and investing in it could save the USPS.