Using Behavioral Marketing Is Spying on Consumers

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Is this really the best we can do? Really? ("Focus on Consumers, Not Their Actions," March 28) Use technology like behavioral marketing and its kin to surreptitiously spy on Internet users (us!) as we travel from Web site to Web site, trying to discern who we are, what we want and when we want it? Who among us wouldn't call the cops in a heartbeat if someone were following us around like this in the real world?


It's just this kind of privacy invasion (justified as "target marketing") that continues to scare the bejeebers out of the public while providing the press with ample grist for the mill. How can we blame them?


Is this the best we can do? I think not.


Steve Morsa, Founder, Match Engine Marketing, Thousand Oaks, CA


stevemorsa@cs.com



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