Upromise launches paperless coupons

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To make it easier for its members to find and redeem grocery savings, shopping rewards program Upromise is introducing paperless coupons.

The new eCoupons program will make new coupons available each month. Members can use them by clicking on participating products at www.Upromise.com/eCoupons. Each coupon is then automatically linked to members' registered grocery or drugstore cards, and can be redeemed in their Upromise account upon purchase of those products in-store. Consumers can also e-mail or print a list of their eCoupons as a reminder.

“Consumers love coupons, and we have the unique ability to make them easier to redeem than ever before by offering national savings on everyday products in a way that fits with their current shopping habits,” said David Rochon, president of Upromise, in a statement. “For manufacturers, Upromise eCoupons is an exciting new national electronic platform to drive customer use and foster brand loyalty in a highly cost-efficient, environmentally friendly manner.”

Upromise has more than 9 million members and partners including LL Bean, CVS, ExxonMobil, Citi, Target, Bloomingdale's and Travelocity. When a member purchases a partner's product, he or she receives a portion of the spending back in the form of college savings.

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