Technology Gains in Spam Fight, FTC Study Finds

Share this article:
Spammers continue to harvest e-mail addresses from public areas of the Internet, but Internet service providers are using anti-spam technology to block the vast majority of spam sent to those addresses, the Federal Trade Commission said yesterday.


The FTC studied three aspects of spam: address harvesting, the effectiveness of spam filtering by ISPs and the effectiveness of using "masked" e-mail addresses as a way to prevent the harvesting of addresses.


To conduct the study, FTC staff members created 150 new undercover e-mail accounts, 50 at an ISP that uses no anti-spam filters and 50 each at two ISPs that use spam filters. They then posted the addresses on 50 Internet sites including message boards, blogs, chat rooms and USENET groups where spammers might go to harvest the addresses.


Though spammers continue to harvest addresses posted on Web sites, the study said, addresses posted in chat rooms, message boards, USENET groups and blogs were unlikely to be harvested.


After a five-week trial, e-mail addresses at the unfiltered ISP received 8,855 spam messages while the totals were 1,208 at one of the ISPs that used filtering technology and 422 via the other.


Share this article:
You must be a registered member of Direct Marketing News to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Digital Marketing

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

Featured Listings

More in Digital Marketing

Mobile Spend Vaults 76 Percent in First Half, IAB Reports

Mobile Spend Vaults 76 Percent in First Half, ...

Overall Internet ad revenues escalate by 15% to $23 billion, also fueled by increased activity in social media and video.

Top 20 Percent Is Twice as Good at Converting as the Rest

Top 20 Percent Is Twice as Good at ...

There are five reasons elite marketers trounce the competition: testing, targeting, spending, mobilizing, and democratizing.

Ecstatic Over Programmatic

Ecstatic Over Programmatic

Ads purchased programmatically will double this year to $10 billion, and then again to $20 billion in 2016, a new study forecasts.