Taco Bell appoints Niccol head marketer

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Brian Niccol
Brian Niccol

Taco Bell has named Brian Niccol its chief marketing and innovation officer, said Taco Bell spokesperson Rob Poetsch via email on Oct. 14. Niccol starts on Oct. 24 with the Yum! Brands-owned company.

Advertising Age first reported news of the hire on Oct. 13.

Niccol will oversee the integration of Taco Bell's marketing, food innovation, consumer insights, media, brand reputation and public relations operations, said Poetsch.

Poetsch said the position is new to the company and “was created specifically to build a better and more relevant Taco Bell brand through an integrated, consumer-centric approach.” David Ovens had been Taco Bell's CMO until he resigned the position in August.

Taco Bell considered “a number of internal and external candidates” for the position, said Poetsch.

Niccol had previously served as general manager at Taco Bell's sibling brand Pizza Hut and had been the brand's CMO prior to that role.

In January, Taco Bell responded to a lawsuit questioning its meat ingredients with a series of marketing initiatives that included a search marketing campaign and a digital coupon campaign on Facebook.

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