Study: Internet is Growing in Use for Repeat Online Orders

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A study from infoUSA's Millard Group, claims there is remarkable growth in the use of the Internet for repeat online orders.

More than 53 percent of customers placed an online purchase during the past quarter. These consumers said they placed three or more orders online from a catalog site within the past year, an increase of 6 percent from infoUSA's Navigation and Usability study conducted in spring 2005.

The Decision Direct Research Quarterly Online Co-op Survey showed shifts in what online buyers consider important.

For example, consumer shopping carts being saved on the exiting site increased in importance by 8 percentage points from 2005 to 2006. Consumers wanting an e-mail reminder alerting them of items in their shopping cart increased by 2 percentage points.

This survey marks the first time that Decision Direct Research reported a drop in the importance of the "good value for the money" criterion, with scores dipping by 4 percent to 38 percent this year from 42 percent in 2005.

On the other hand, the importance of "high quality merchandise" increased 2-percentage points year over year to 55 percent.

Shoppers have become savvier, the study said. They expect more options, functions and overall ease of use.

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