SPSS Releases SPSS 10.0 and Clementine Server 5.1

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SPSS, Chicago, announced the release this week of SPSS 10.0, the newest version of its flagship data analysis software, which will be available at the end of this month.


The software features a server version for increased performance and scalability, a new mapping module for better strategy development and XML model exportation to assist the front-line decision makers.


It will be available in a distributed analysis architecture. The software can eliminate file size limitations, facilitate data access from numerous sources, and it allows administrators to maintain a high level of data security.


According to SPSS, the software can help many analysts tackle challenging questions at the same time. It helps reduce IT resource needs and is fast and flexible. Features and upgrades include a new data editor, the ability to export models in XML format and improvements to data access and management.


In other news, SPSS announced Clementine Server 5.1, a large-scale, distributed data-mining software package. Clementine also will ship at the end of September.


The design of Clementine gets users to a data-mining solution faster by speeding up data access and preparation.


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