Sony Online Adds Primus Self-Help Application

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Sony Online Entertainment, which operates EverQuest, the popular Internet fantasy role-playing game, has installed a Primus self-help feature at its Station.com Web site to improve customer service, the companies said yesterday.


Visitors to Station.com can click on the site's help button to access a search engine that seeks out pre-written solutions to common problems experienced by users of Sony Online Entertainment games. After the visitor types the problem into a query blank, the engine responds with a menu of topics likely to solve the user's difficulties.


The application also allows visitors to contact support personnel by e-mail. In addition, it gives site visitors the option of e-mailing the problem -- and its solution if one is available -- to a friend.


According to San Diego-based Sony Online, Station.com supports 10 million members and approximately 396,999 EverQuest subscribers. The company also operates online versions of "Wheel of Fortune" and "Jeopardy!"


Seattle-based Primus, the company that supplied the technology for the self-help application, is a maker of customer relationship management systems.


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