Site Lets Users Register Electronics Purchases

Share this article:
eWarrantyCard.com, which launched Christmas Day, is hoping to become the premier destination for consumers looking to register their electronics items and other goods.


The site provides a template registration form that can be used to register virtually any item. The form then is sent in bunches to manufacturers. Users receive an e-mail confirmation when the warranty is received. The goal is to provide a useful site for consumers and a necessary site for suppliers. It will be a free service for consumers. However, there are plans to charge companies for the service after an 18-month trial period.


Companies will likely continue to use the service because of its cost-effective nature, said Jay Goodman, CEO of eWarrantyCard.com, San Jose, CA. "It costs companies up to $1.50 per warranty card because of the data entry involved," he said. "We plan on charging 20 cents."


The company hopes to achieve critical mass through partnerships with online malls, retailers and auction houses, according to Goodman.


Because of privacy concerns, the site will delete all consumer information after 30 days. After that time, it will keep only consumers' e-mail addresses and birth dates. Goodman plans to send past users a card on their birthday every year as a reminder to use the site.


The warranty submissions are generally sent to manufacturers through e-mail, but the site can also send submissions via mail or fax.
Share this article:
close

Next Article in Digital Marketing

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

Featured Listings

More in Digital Marketing

News Byte: CX Scores to Take Their Place Beside Price Listings

News Byte: CX Scores to Take Their Place ...

E-commerce aggregator PriceGrabber will begin offsetting price info with service expectations.

Data Byte: Interactive Ad Revenues Exceeding TV for the First Time

Data Byte: Interactive Ad Revenues Exceeding TV for ...

At nearly $43 billion, interactive advertising revenues exceeded broadcast for the first time in 2013.

Marketers: Data Rich and Knowledge Poor

Marketers: Data Rich and Knowledge Poor

While advertisers have become incredibly data-savvy, the most difficult challenge remains causally linking that data to outcomes that really matter.