SAMHSA, Ad Council address teen suicide

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The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has joined the Ad Council and the Inspire USA Foundation to conduct a PSA-focused integrated campaign to reduce teen suicide. DDB New York created the push, which launched April 1.  

The organizations' goal in creating the “We can help us” campaign is addressing teens' pressures and telling them they are not alone.

The initiative includes social media and an interactive Web site, as well as in-school and mall posters, and TV and radio ads. The spots target teenagers ages 13 to 17.

The creative elements encourage teens to visit www.reachout.com, which was developed by Inspire USA. The site includes a user community where teens can share their stories. It also educates consumers about warning signs for suicide, depression and eating disorders, and has advice on relationships.

The Ad Council and SAMHSA are collaborating with Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), National Organizations for Youth Safety (NOYS) and other youth and mental health organizations to promote the campaign. They will raise awareness of the effort on the groups' Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as the Ad Council's social media site, MyAdCouncil.com.

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