Profits and Basics Will Change Internet

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I loved Ken Magill's open letter to the Association of Internet Professionals. What will change minds about the Internet industry is one thing and one thing only -- profits. Actually, the explanation or story behind those profits will be the real news. When the business world sees that companies spend $2 and make $4.25 in 90 days and they did it with good business sense and acumen, the AIP won't have to worry about PR campaigns for Wall Street.


What will change public perceptions are the basics, including mutual respect for customers and subscribers (no snooping on browsing activity), real value for the price paid and convenience.


I remember the advent of 1-800 numbers. Catalog and other business shot through the roof! Why? Companies made it easier for customers to do business with them safely and quickly.


The Internet is that times three. Make it easier, more informative, entertaining and -- above all -- safe. It is much safer to enter your credit card number on a secure form than it is to give it over the phone.


These are the things the AIP should be focused on.


Mike Carney, President, DirectQlick.com, Mission Viejo, CA


mike@directqlick.com



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