Presidential Inaugural Comittee Sells Election Paraphernalia

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Wish to remember the seemingly unending 2000 presidential election with something more than memories about court fights, recounts and pregnant chads?


The Presidential Inaugural Committee has made commemorative items for the Jan. 20 presidential inauguration available through its catalog and online at www.inauguralgiftshop.com.


Shoppers can either go online or request a catalog by phone, fax or writing the Inaugural Gift Shop in Beltsville, MD. Prices for souvenir items range from $2 to $1,000 and include commemorative pins, silver plate frames with the official inaugural seal, license plates, tie bar and cufflink sets, and presidential pens with the inaugural seal on the tip of the cap and President-elect George W. Bush's signature on the side of the cap.


"By offering products in every price range, the committee hopes all citizens will have access to souvenirs for this historic celebration," said Jeanne Johnson Phillips, executive director at the Presidential Inaugural Committee.


Items will be available through the end of the year, and revenues will be given to charities that are favorites of the president-elect and his family.
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