Postmasters Don't Want a Union

Share this article:
Unfortunately, Cary H. Baer has either been misled or is misinformed about the Postmaster Fairness and Rights Act, H.R. 250/S. 177. It does not reinterpret postmaster responsibilities. The act does not "change the definition of what is the responsibility of postal management." Postmasters don't want to be appointed by members of Congress, and postmasters do not want to be in a union.


Postmasters want a financially viable postal service with appropriate accountability. H.R. 250/S. 177 attempts to encourage accountability -- yes, the same goal that mailers desire. For postmasters, the accountability must be between the postal service and its postmasters. Under current law, postmasters merely "consult" over postal operations and compensation. There's absolutely no means of bringing to a constructive closure real operational issues that would greatly benefit the mailing public.


Consequently, postmasters seek to put in place a mechanism to ensure such accountability between its frontline managers, those who interact daily with mailers and residential customers. A bipartisan coalition of more than 250 members of the House, including Rep. Danny Davis, agree, and 43 senators agree.


Bob Levi, Director of government relations, National Association of Postmasters of the United States, Alexandria, VA


blevi@napus.org



Share this article:

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in Opinions

The One-to-One Future Is Now

The One-to-One Future Is Now

Editor-in-Chief Ginger Conlon offers her take on what it means to make an impact on the marketing industry.

Leading by (Poor) Example: Answers

Leading by (Poor) Example: Answers

The VP of marketing has been a little lax in his definition of the term "business expense" and it shows. See how our readers would handle this thorny situation.

Attention Marketing Consultants: Protect Yourselves

Attention Marketing Consultants: Protect Yourselves

A lot can go wrong when you're a marketing consultant—but there are plenty of ways to safeguard yourself if you're smart about it.