Our look at the most - and least - engaging social media

Share this article:

Cheer mixed Australian band Strange Talk's 
"Climbing Walls" music video with measurable interactive elements. Consumers could click on items featured in the video for a chance to win prizes such as clothes, a Fender Stratocaster guitar or an Apple iPod. Within two weeks of launching the "Dig It. Get It." campaign scored 335,000 views and more than 13,000 clicks. The effort also created ROI for a view-only online video ad, a tough job for 
any marketer.


Hotels.com launched an integrated campaign with energetic video spots of stuntman JT Holmes using its "high-speed booking application" during a freefall. The site also used a microsite, display ads, social media activation and exclusive mobile app offers to promote the technology. The videos show the product's ease-of-use and suggest the exhilaration of travel, but the campaign's Facebook and Twitter elements do nothing more than drive consumers to the product registration page. 


TCBY conducted a 30th anniversary sweepstakes encouraging consumers to "like" its Facebook page and submit their name, email, mailing address and phone number in return for coupons and discounts. The frozen yogurt company gave all entrants 30% off a single product and awarded two winners a $30 gift certificate every weekday in September. It also gave one consumer a $300 gift certificate and a year's worth of free yogurt — a tempting offer
to be sure. The brand deserves credit for using data collection and prizes, but it showed little innovation
in its run-of-the-mill Facebook sweepstakes.

Bare Escentuals conducted a "blind casting call" to select women for its "Be a Force of Beauty" campaign. The promotion's goal was to highlight women who are beautiful regardless of physical attributes and to champion individual stories with the belief that "beauty goes beyond the surface." However, the cosmetics company limited this initiative to a pool of 300 actresses and models, and the multichannel campaign received negative commentary for omitting "real" women on its Facebook page. 


This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in any form without prior authorization. Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of Haymarket Media's Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions