Organization Encourages People to Remove Names From Mailing Lists

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The Center for a New American Dream launched a campaign last week encouraging people to remove their names from mailing lists in order to reduce the paper waste associated with postal direct mail.


The not-for-profit organization described itself as dedicated to the responsible use of resources. It posted forms on its Web site, www.newdream.org, that visitors can print out and send to the Direct Marketing Association Mail Preference Service and to individual database companies to have their names removed from marketing lists.


The campaign, which New American is promoting to its members through direct e-mail and its newsletter, helped the site draw 250,000 visitors last week, according to Eric Brown, a spokesman for the Takoma Park, MD, organization. By comparison, the site had a record 500,000 visitors during the entire month of June.


Brown said he did not know how many people have printed the forms, although he estimated the number to be in the thousands. The site also includes an e-mail form letter that visitors can use to send information about the campaign to others.


Brown said the company planned to offer the services on its Web site indefinitely, although the effort will not continue to receive its current level of promotional support.
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