News Byte: Free Shipping is now Table Stakes for E-Coms

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A decision-maker for 77% of shoppers
A decision-maker for 77% of shoppers

Eighty percent of Americans shopping Internet sites consider shipping in general—and free shipping specifically—to be an important factor in their purchase decisions. Almost half (47%) say they pay more attention to shipping in their consideration process than they did three years ago and a slightly larger number (49%) say they have abandoned their carts because of high shipping costs.

These findings are the result of an October telephone survey of more than 1,000 adults in the United States commissioned by Pitney Bowes. The interviews also revealed:

  • Free shipping is an immensely greater marketing tool (77% of respondents) than is fast shipping (19%).

  • While free shipping's king, fast shipping's still important. More than 80% who made online purchases last year said they tracked a package.

  • The threshold shipping price for abandonment is $20, on average. For men, it's $24.

"There's now a blurred line between the decision on shipping method and the seletion of a product in the overall buying decision," says Jim Hendrickson, VP and GM of shipping solutions for Pitney Bowes.

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