*MSGi Direct Streamlines New York Staff

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MSGi Direct cut back its New York staff earlier this month to eliminate redundancies within the organization due to the consolidation of three of its subsidiary companies.


"As a function of identifying all the strengths and weaknesses within the companies, we were pleased to find that there were no gaps, but there were some redundant functions between the organizations," said Robert M. Budlow, senior vice president and general manager at MSGi Direct, New York.


As part of the continuing consolidation of the list companies -- Metro Direct, Stevens-Knox & Associates and The Coolidge Co. -- Budlow said that fewer than 10 employees were laid off on Nov. 17.


MSGi Direct has owned Metro Direct since 1987. It acquired Stevens-Knox in early 1999 and Coolidge in April of this year.


Those laid off primarily performed back-office functions that existed at all three companies, Budlow said.


He added that the New York layoffs did not indicate a corporationwide trend.


"With over 1,000 employees -- employees make MSGi Direct's business -- that's who we value the most," Budlow said. "However, on a daily basis we're always looking at this organization to make it better, faster and stronger."


Budlow said MSGi Direct has no plans to cut back its list business.
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