More advertisers turning to newsletters

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The number of newsletters accepting advertising almost tripled over the past five years, according to the 2007 edition of the Oxbridge Directory of Newsletters, released yesterday.

Between 2002 and 2007, the number of newsletters accepting advertising rose from 1,052 to 3,085.

While newsletters have traditionally relied on subscription revenue, advertisers are increasingly attracted to the targeted readership newsletters offer in an increasingly competitive media environment.

The fastest-growing newsletter categories in 2006 were natural history/wildlife, which experienced a jump in titles from 23 to 66; trucking, which increased from 24 to 34; and nutrition, which rose from 45 to 56.

Overall, legal newsletters continued to lead all categories, with 1,125 titles, up from 1,033 in 2006. They were followed by medical newsletters with 845 titles, up from 802, and computers and automation with 748 titles, up from 719 last year.

Electronic newsletters also continue to grow, increasing to 4,306 titles from 3,813 last year.

There are more than 14,128 US and Canadian newsletters listed in the 2007 edition of the directory.

The Oxbridge Directory of Newsletters is published by Oxbridge Communications, New York.

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