Melissa Data Offers PLANET Codes

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Melissa Data, a data quality software and services provider, announced a partnership Sept. 8 with Trackmymail.com, Gaithersburg, MD, in which PLANET Code tracking services will be offered to volume mailers.


PLANET Codes are barcoded labels that are scanned by the U.S. Postal Service as the mail moves through postal delivery points. The PLANET Code identifies the mailer, and the scanning data is transmitted to account holders.


High-volume mailers such as retailers, banks and publishers rely on PLANET Code technology to measure the effectiveness of mailings, schedule follow-up mailings, identify delivery problems in specific markets or coordinate telemarketing and other media.


As a mail piece is sorted on a USPS barcode sorter, the sorter reads the PLANET Code, which identifies the mailer and the mailing. The USPS sends this scan data to Trackmymail.com, where it is posted on the Web in real-time reports.


Melissa Data, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, will offer preprinted PLANET Code labels in TracKits provided by Trackmymail.com. Prices for the TracKits are: a kit with 150 PLANET Code labels, $60; with 500 PLANET Code labels, $70; and with 1,000 labels, $80. For more details, visit http://www.melissadata.com/track.


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