Mailers lax on IMB compliance

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PRC puts limits on full-service IMb implementation.
PRC puts limits on full-service IMb implementation.
Many people have been asking what the price point will be for a full-service compared to the basic IMB, as well as the Postnet code, according to Day. The USPS understands that there is a level of investment required by mailers and that there needs to be a financial incentive that is necessary to drive them to go with the full-service option, he said.

However, because the USPS is operating under the new Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, the agency will not be able to legally communicate that price until about February, Day said. “It's a legal requirement,” he pointed out.

Day said the overall response the agency has received has been “very positive.” In addition to four symposia on the Intelli­gent Mail barcode held in March in cities across the country, the USPS has also held focus groups at about 80 of its districts across the US in January and February, Day said. The barcode will also be a topic of discussion at the upcoming National Postal Forum this month, he added.

The USPS is also soliciting public com­ment on its proposed rules related to the use of the barcode on automation mailings of letters and flats. According to the pro­posed rules, mailers would have a choice between two Intelligent Mail options. With the basic option, mailers would use the Intelligent Mail barcode on letters and flats in place of the Postnet barcode.

The full-service option would require mailers to use unique Intelligent Mail bar­codes on mail pieces and to use Intelligent Mail tray and container barcodes. When required, mailers would also have to elec­tronically submit postage statements and mailing documentation before mailings are inducted, among other requirements. Those using the full-service option would receive greater benefits and qualify for lower prices than the basic option, accord­ing to the USPS.

These rules, which were published in the Federal Register on April 30, are sched­uled to go into effect by May 2009, and comments are due to the USPS by May 30, 2008.

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