Magazine Yellow Pages increases response by 50% with personalization and testing

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Magazine Yellow Pages has seen a 50% response rate after adding personalization to its e-mail marketing program.

Working with e-mail and database services firm Intellidyn, Magazine Yellow Pages was able to test its e-mail and add personalized content to the e-mails to help lift its click-through rate to 50%. The test included sending one group of 40,000 a set of creative and degree of personalization and second set of 40,000 another set of content.

“We looked at our list and tried to figure out which people can really can handle getting two, three, four e-mails a month without blasting them and losing them,” said Cathy Miller Beers, president of Magazine Yellow Pages.

Magazine Yellow Pages sells about 700 major magazines, including a number of niche magazine titles. The Magazine Yellow Pages audience encompasses magazine readers across the US, which skews heavily female.

Beers said that she has found that knowing what a person subscribes to can really help create a personalized e-mail. Magazine Yellow Pages uses this to track a customer's profile, send them creative and then track this information for future mailings.
 
“E-mail is a highly personalized tool,” she said. “It should be used to present something that is relevant, with good copy, a striking visual and an offer that means something to the customer.”
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