MADD Named DMA Nonprofit of the Year

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NEW YORK -- The Direct Marketing Association Nonprofit Federation named Mothers Against Drunk Driving its 2004 Nonprofit Organization of the Year during a luncheon ceremony yesterday at the federation's 2004 New York Nonprofit Conference.


"This is a tremendous honor as MADD's success in achieving its mission to stop drunk driving, support victims of this violent crime and prevent underage drinking is tied to primarily two things: funds available, which is driven by direct marketing programs; and the tremendous work of our volunteers and staff," said Laura Dean-Mooney, national board member.


MADD works with Creative Direct Response Inc., Dial America Marketing Inc. and The Heritage Company for its direct marketing efforts. The organization mails 22 million pieces annually. More than 80 percent of MADD's expenses go toward programs, victims' services and educational activities, while less than 20 percent is spent on fundraising, management and general expenses.


To be eligible for the nonprofit award, organizations must show successful direct response marketing techniques; outstanding financial performance; ethical nonprofit standards; accepted standards for management and public disclosure; and a strong reputation in the nonprofit and direct marketing fields as well as with the public.


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