Letter: USPS Already Has a Mail Suppression Service

Share this article:
Dick Goldsmith thinks it may be unconstitutional to deny the U.S. Postal Service access to a mailbox as long as the mailer has paid the proper postage (Letters, Aug. 4).


In fact, the postal service itself has a relatively simple means for any recipient to effectively block further receipt of virtually any type of advertising mail. It has existed for more than 35 years, as memory serves. Refer to Sections C032 (Sexually Oriented Advertising) and C033 (Pandering Advertisements) of the Domestic Mail Manual. It is stated explicitly that it is "in the addressee's sole discretion" to determine that the mail is "erotically arousing or sexually provocative."


Whether the advertisement is for lingerie, the Bible or Disney merchandise, one only has to fill out a Post Office Form 1500, and the mailer must not repeat that offer to the addressee. Violations are subject to stiff penalties.


But, shhh. Keep it under your hat. There is very little promotion of these regulations, and at present there are not too many names on the pandering file.


Fred Woolf, President, Fred Woolf List Co. Inc., White Plains, NY


Share this article:
close

Next Article in Opinions

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in Opinions

The One-to-One Future Is Now

The One-to-One Future Is Now

Editor-in-Chief Ginger Conlon offers her take on what it means to make an impact on the marketing industry.

Leading by (Poor) Example: Answers

Leading by (Poor) Example: Answers

The VP of marketing has been a little lax in his definition of the term "business expense" and it shows. See how our readers would handle this thorny situation.

Attention Marketing Consultants: Protect Yourselves

Attention Marketing Consultants: Protect Yourselves

A lot can go wrong when you're a marketing consultant—but there are plenty of ways to safeguard yourself if you're smart about it.