Letter: Could 'Permission' Method Filter Out Spam?

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I agree with Ken Magill that the spam issue is being sidestepped by the Direct Marketing Association's narrow, self-serving definition and that it reflects poorly on an already beleaguered industry ("Ahhh, So That's What Spam Is!" July 21).


I recently e-mailed a business associate for the first time after speaking with her by phone and getting her permission to send some attachments to her e-mail address. Her server had a filtering system that allowed her to reply to me first, notifying me that she was using a filter and asking me to reply from my e-mail address so that my e-mail address could be added to her database of "allowed" correspondents.


This "permission" method seemed to be a good way to compile a list of bona fide correspondents and filter out all the other unwanted spam.


Is this a feasible solution for the rest of us who are having to rely on other types of filters that work only from finite lists of unacceptable words, topics, etc?


David Dennard, Dragon Street Records, Dallas


dragonst@flash.net



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