Kodak Wraps Up BTB Campaign

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Dynamic Imaging, a division of Eastman Kodak Co., completed the third and final phase this week of the first major marketing campaign for its Kodamotion advertising tool with a drop of 35,000 direct mail pieces.


The business-to-business campaign seeks to raise awareness of the technology and to generate leads among Fortune 500 companies and the top 100 advertising agencies in the country. The mailing, which cost approximately $50,000, is generating 50 to 60 responses a day.


The campaign spanned 18 months. The first mailing of 35,000 pieces went out in November 1999 and had a response rate of 5 percent. The second mailing of 29,000 pieces, which dropped last June, had a response rate of 3.5 percent.


Kodamotion technology allows advertisers to put three to five seconds of video motion on two-dimensional cards as large as 48 inches by 72 inches. The motion plays out as the card is turned. The cards are used in promotions, premiums, direct mail pieces, point-of-purchase displays and sales collateral. Companies such as Coca-Cola, Ford, General Motors and Universal Studios have used the technology.


The mailing, like the first two, targets advertising and brand managers along with creative and production executives. But Dynamic Imaging made two changes for the third mailing.


First, the latest pieces target companies in Canada as well as the United States. And because companies have cut back on advertising spending in recent months, Kodak changed the message to focus on a client's success with Kodamotion and research data showing the card's "stickiness" compared with two-dimensional print ads of the same image.


"We saw the slowing economy as an opportunity to reach out to advertisers and show them, based on an actual example and research, that they could get more effectiveness and value out of their advertising dollars by using Kodamotion," said Barbara Mather, director of marketing and sales at Dynamic Imaging, Los Angeles.


Mather said an independent study by PreTesting Co., Tenafly, NJ, found that the technology had five times the stopping power and two times the staying power of a two-dimensional print ad.


Kodak sent the pieces in a two-fold, personalized self-mailer wrapped in plastic. Glued to the front of the piece is a Kodamotion card. The theme of each mail piece is tied to before-and-after images that highlight the card's visual impact.


The latest mailing used a pretzel as the before image and an image of a diver who turns into a snowboarder when the card is moved. The headline of the piece reads: "Add a new twist to your marketing."


The text inside outlines the benefits of Kodamotion and its advantages over two-dimensional print advertising. This is followed by a list of companies that are using the technology and the success one of its customers had using it.


A toll-free number, a Web address and a business reply card are provided as calls-to-action. The BRC consists of a brief questionnaire that asks what industry the recipient works in, whether he has a specific marketing program in mind and what quantity of dynamic images the campaign might require.


Dynamic Imaging worked with Integrated Marketing Partners, San Francisco, to develop the campaign.


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