'Junk' mail label broadens, says Return Path

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'Junk' mail label broadens, says Return Path
'Junk' mail label broadens, says Return Path

Finding that 56.4% of consumers say they receive high volumes of junk e-mail from marketers, when junk is defined as “e-mail from companies I know but that is just not interesting to me," e-mail service provider Return Path has put the onus on the retailer.

The study, titled “Email Connections Are Down, but Opportunity to Build Relationships and Increase Sales is Up,” found that many retailers did not take advantage of the e-mail channel as best they could have this holiday season.

Marketers looking to gain a consumer's attention should focus on segmenting based on a consumer's behavior and demographics and send more relevant marketing messages.

Fifty-eight percent of respondents say they determine the value of each e-mail message based on the subject line.

The subject line and from line, as well as a consistent schedule of mailing may help boost response, as 52.3% of respondents delete messages they don't recognize and 29.1% feel they come too frequently.

Slightly less than a third of subscribers say they only open messages from brands they know. However, another 14.4% said that regardless of brand, they only open the e-mail if they requested the particular message type.

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