JangoMail to authenticate e-mail with DomainKeys

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E-mail marketing firm JangoMail will now support open-standard e-mail-authentication-specific actions DomainKeys and the DomainKeys Identified Mail protocol.

Support for DomainKeys and the DomainKeys Identified Mail protocol is designed to authenticate organizations using e-mail marketing campaigns as trusted senders.

JangoMail is deploying these new technologies as part of its debut of a new custom-built Mail Transport Agent, a high-speed e-mail distribution software. JangoMail customers will be able to manage DomainKeys and DomainKeys Identified Mail settings for domains from within the Web interface.

DomainKeys is an e-mail authentication standard designed to verify both the domain of each e-mail sender and the integrity of messages sent. Mark Delany of Yahoo designed the program. DomainKeys Identified Mail is based on Yahoo's DomainKeys and Cisco's Identified Mail technologies. The tools validate an identity that is associated with a message during the time it is transferred over the Internet, at which point that identity can then be held accountable for the message.

JangoMail already offers support for SenderID, an authentication technology backed by Microsoft that validates the origin of e-mail by verifying the Internet provider address of the sender against the purported owner of the sending domain.

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