J. Crew Kids Graduates to Main Catalog

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J. Crew will promote its new children's clothing line in its catalogs for the first time with an insert in the fall catalog, which will drop July 21.


The 24-page insert will run in 1 million of its fall catalogs. The front cover will direct customers to the insert.


The specialty retailer of adult sportswear opened J. Crew Kids online in March, targeting children ages 6 to 12. The online debut followed a trend among retailers of using the Internet as a launch pad for new products. Last year Gap Inc. introduced its GapMaternity line for online-only sales, while Eddie Bauer offered its children's apparel line on the Internet last fall.


J. Crew's fall catalogs, with a total circulation of 8 million, also will promote the Reading Is Fundamental program to promote literacy. The cover will feature the promotion prominently along with the RIF emblem, while the inside cover will explain fundraising efforts.


J. Crew will donate $1 to RIF for every pair of adult and children's denim jeans and chinos bought from its catalog, Web site and stores between July 20 and Sept. 3, up to $100,000.


J. Crew has more than 100 retail stores nationwide and mails more than 80 million catalogs annually.


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