Information Builders Picked as Consultant for PostalOne

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Information Builders, a Web business intelligence vendor, has been named by the U.S. Postal Service as a consultant for the agency's PostalOne project, an electronic partnership between the agency and its large-volume mailers, the vendor said yesterday.


PostalOne allows Standard Mail, Standard-B and First-Class mailers to connect electronically with the USPS and mailing facilities to exchange mailing information, electronic documentation and postage payment in real time. For example, large mailers will be able to search directly on the Internet for lost mail pieces.


The USPS said the program is designed to eliminate all paperwork on the mail acceptance side, thereby reducing staging, waiting and transportation times and expediting the flow of mail from mailer to recipient.


As a consultant, Information Builders, New York, will help develop and enhance the PostalOne database.


The company will maintain and perform the logistical and physical design of the database using the tools recommended by the postal IT organization DBSS in Raleigh, NC. Information Builders will also provide the services necessary to develop, use and support the database's physical development.


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