Inbox Insider: The beauty of one login across multiple brands

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Registration pages can sometimes be a pain. You have to stop and enter in all of your personal information, give them your e-mail address and create a password that hopefully you will not forget or confuse with other passwords. That is why I love co-registration pages among brands under the same umbrella or partners.

The other day I was shopping online at Old Navy. I had never shopped there before, and when it came time to check out, I was surprised when I tried to register and it said that I already had an account under my e-mail address. It turns out that I have shopped at Banana Republic and Gap online and that my account is all accessible under one login.

When shopping at Target.com over Christmas, I was amazed when I didn't have to create a Target account and the site invited me to login to my Amazon e-mail and password.

Not only does this make the customer experience easier, it gives marketers more information on the back end. I am more likely to purchase kids clothes from Old Navy and wool sweaters from Banana Republic and knowing this is good for a marketer. It is important for marketers to keep information on customers streamlined, rather than siloing by brand. After all, if they apply this information in a future campaign to me, they can be much more relevant and I may be more likely to buy.
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