Habeas Expands E-Mail Reputation Database

Share this article:

E-mail reputation firm Habeas, Mountain View, CA, said today it is tracking the reputations of millions of IP addresses, not just those of its certified e-mail senders.

It is launching SenderIndex, an e-mail reputation database of more than 60 million IP addresses and domains, segmented into three categories: Habeas SafeList, Habeas AcceptList and Habeas BlockList.

While it has always tracked IP addresses that pass its certified e-mail accreditation program on its Habeas SafeList, Habeas now tracks addresses that also do not pass its certification tests.

"This is a comprehensive reputation database, which has information about positive and negative reputation," said Des Cahill, CEO, Habeas. "ISPS receive millions of e-mails from IP addresses, every day they are trying to figure out which ones are legitimate and which ones are not."

The new Habeas AcceptList represents IP addresses that have passed all of Habeas's Reputation Engine tests and are determined not to be bad senders, such as spammers or phishers. But, these IP addresses have not passed the Habeas Certify e-mail accreditation program.

The Habeas BlockList includes IP addresses that fail the bulk of Habeas's reputation tests and appear to be spammers or phishers.

Share this article:
close

Next Article in Email Marketing

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in Email Marketing

Email Opens Have Increased While Clicks Remain Static

Email Opens Have Increased While Clicks Remain Static

Open rates rose to 32.9% in Q1 2014, but clicks haven't changed for the past couple of years, a study says. But why?

Is Reliance on Email Stifling Lead Nurturing?

Is Reliance on Email Stifling Lead Nurturing?

Pressure to drive revenue has some B2B marketers looking to take a more multichannel approach to lead nurturing.

Blame Canada? CASL Leads to SPAM in the Short-Term

Blame Canada? CASL Leads to SPAM in the ...

In the email world, silence does not consent—at least not in Canada, where much fretted over anti-spam legislation went into effect on July 1.