GotMarketing Debuts Opt-In List Builder for E-Mail

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GotMarketing Inc., a provider of permission-based e-mail marketing software, yesterday introduced Opt-in List Builder, software that enables marketers to easily request, collect and store e-mail addresses from Web site visitors.


The company said Opt-In List Builder includes a graphical icon that acts as a "call-to-action" on a Web site. That call-to-action can read "Sign Up for Our Newsletter" or "Become a Member" and includes the HTML necessary to capture the e-mail addresses of Web site visitors and confirm their desire to receive mail in the future.


E-mail capture is automatic, GotMarketing, Cambell, CA, said, eliminating the need to manually download information from an in-house database to a list manager.


"If businesses aren't asking Web site visitors if they'd like to receive e-mails in the future, they are missing an enormous opportunity to generate leads, increase revenue and build customer loyalty," said Teri Dahlbeck, president and co-founder of GotMarketing.


The company said that Opt-in List Builder generates real-time reports on how many e-mail addresses each icon collects. In addition to e-mail addresses, the software also can be configured to capture first and last names.


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