Gmail's Unsubscribe Button Unlikely to Affect Marketers

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Marketers shouldn't worry too much about the new feature, but that doesn't mean they shouldn't pay attention.


In an official Google Plus update earlier last week, Google unveiled a new “unsubscribe” button for Gmail users. According to the post, the aim is to decrease the likelihood of emails being marked as spam and to simplify the unsubscribing process; putting an end to, “sifting through an entire message for that one pesky link.” 

Essentially, if Gmail detects an unsubscribe link in a message it will copy that link next to the sender's address in the email header.

Talk of this feature has circulated around the Web since as early as February. Now that it's live, will this new feature disrupt email marketing or displace the channel? “Absolutely not,” says Spencer Kollas, director of deliverability at Experian Marketing Services. “It's something we're going to monitor and keep our eyes on, but much like the Promotions Tab, it won't change the way most marketers create email campaigns.”

Kollas notes that Gmail will only apply the button for senders it considers “good.” This is, of course, contingent on the mailer's reputation within Google's system. “[The feature] is a positive. There's nothing bad about it,” Kollas says. “Will it change the way people interact with email? Probably not.”
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