Freelancer Files Web Property Suit Against Boston Globe

Share this article:
One of the emerging legal controversies regarding intellectual property and the Internet came to the surface yesterday when freelance writers, photographers and illustrators filed a class action lawsuit against The Boston Globe Newspaper Co.


According to a prepared statement released on behalf of plaintiff Bill Marx, the lawsuit stems from The Globe asking its freelancers to sign an agreement that permits the news organization to republish their content across any medium, while the contributing professional yields copyrights for future sales of such contributed content. Marx, who has contributed freelance book criticism pieces to The Globe, said that the newspaper threatened never to hire his services again if he didn't sign the pact.


The meat of the debate lies in The Globe's rights, through its freelance contracts, to sell archived material online indefinitely for a sum a money per article without compensating the person who submitted the work. Currently, the newspaper's stories are being sold for approximately $2 to $4 at Boston.com.


The legal action is Marx et. al. v. The Globe Newspaper Co. The argument will likely rest on Massachusetts statutes that prohibit deceptive and coercive business practices. The National Writers Union, the Graphic Artists Guild and the American Society of Media Photographers are backing Marx in the case.


The Boston Globe was unavailable to respond to the lawsuit. It hasn't been announced when the lawsuit will go to court.
Share this article:
You must be a registered member of Direct Marketing News to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in News

Hawk Search Widens its Global Reach

Hawk Search Widens its Global Reach

Hawk Search's solution offers support for more than twice as many languages as other site search providers, according to the company.

Candidates Offer Change In The Form of Targeting

Candidates Offer Change In The Form of Targeting

A campaign for Ben Carson raised $2.8 million despite his lack of cooperation.

Target Names Retail Veteran Brian Cornell as CEO

Target Names Retail Veteran Brian Cornell as CEO

He leaves the top job at PepsiCo Foods to take the spot vacated by Greg Steinhafel in the aftermath of the data breach.