*FedEx Introduces E-Commerce Service

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FedEx Corp. yesterday launched FedEx eCommerce Builder, a full-service Internet platform designed to make it easy for small and medium-sized businesses to build and manage an online store.


The tool, which is available at www.fedex.com, contains all core online business processes, including order entry, order processing, billing and product shipment using pre-integrated FedEx Express shipping capabilities.


"Timely fulfillment and customer service are critical components of the online customer experience," said David Roussain, vice president for electronic commerce at FedEx. "Since the FedEx eCommerce Builder is pre-integrated with FedEx Express shipping, merchants can ensure that their customers will receive time-definite delivery services for their orders."


The basic starter solution is free for fedex.com customers. It includes site design, enabling merchants to build an online store themselves; four standard Web pages; a "community" URL located off the FedEx MarketPlace; 50 megabytes of bandwidth; and five megabytes of storage space. It also includes 24/7 merchant support.


The launch of the FedEx eCommerce Builder underscores the company's renewed focus on the small and medium-sized business customer. The company recently launched the International Resource Center, a comprehensive Web site aimed at helping small businesses expand into international markets.
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