FedEx Home Delivery Expands Service

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FedEx Ground will open new FedEx Home Delivery terminals in 85 cities today to meet increasing demand for the residential-only delivery service, parent company FedEx Corp. said yesterday.


In June, the company began an accelerated, two-phase expansion plan that includes opening about 150 FedEx Home Delivery terminals and achieving full U.S. coverage by September 2002, more than one year earlier than originally scheduled.


The 85 terminals increase the coverage of the FedEx Home Delivery network from 50 percent to 70 percent of the U.S. population. The second phase will expand the FedEx Home Delivery network to serve 80 percent of the U.S. population by September.


FedEx Home Delivery offers service options such as standard evening and Saturday delivery as well as delivery by appointment backed by a money-back guarantee.


One company that has used the service with success is uBid.com, which offers brand-name merchandise at greatly reduced prices and has more than 12,000 items in its daily auctions.


Jason MacLean, vice president of operations at uBid.com, said, "We selected FedEx because we wanted to provide uBid customers with more delivery options. FedEx Home Delivery was a natural choice to offer to our customers who do not require next-day service, yet desire the security of shipping with a trusted carrier.''


UBid.com uses FedEx Express for its customers' next-day shipping needs.
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