Entertainment Weekly Starts Multichannel Campaign

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Entertainment Weekly magazine began a consumer advertising campaign yesterday with a series of 30-second and 15-second television spots carrying the publication's new tagline, "There's nothing more entertaining than Entertainment Weekly."


According to the magazine, the spots will air on various network and cable channels along with a print campaign through the end of the year.


The campaign includes television commercials on CBS, NBC, A&E, Comedy Central, E! Entertainment Television, ESPN, FX, The History Channel, MTV, PAX-TV, Sci-Fi Channel, USA Network and WE (Women's Entertainment). The spots also will run on House of Blues TV, America Online and Entertainment Weekly's Web site, EW.com.


The tongue-in-cheek ads focus on the unifying power of pop culture and, specifically, Entertainment Weekly's role as a conversation-starter for obsessive and casual entertainment fans.


The print ads are scheduled to appear in such publications as People, Time, Sports Illustrated and InStyle. They project a similarly irreverent attitude. "We Don't Print Gossip Unless It's Really, Really, Really Juicy," is the headline of one installment, while another touts "The 5 Basic Necessities of Life: Movies, TV, Video, Music & Books."


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