Earle Angstadt was larger than life

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I was sad to learn about the passing of Earle Angstadt. He made a

major impact on my life and career. He was president of Abercrombie &

Fitch Co. (then known as the World's Greatest Sporting Goods Store).

Mr. Angstadt was larger than life. He looked like the president of

A&F, he acted like the president of A&F and he was respected as the

president of A&F.

I was a young salesman in the A&F Fishing Tackle Department. It was

one of the key departments along with camping, sporting arms, golf

and tennis. In 1968 Mr. Angstadt took a chance and approved my

promotion to buyer/manager for the tackle department for all stores

and the A&F catalog. I was way too young and inexperienced. Yet Mr.

Angstadt gave me his confidence. He asked me to do my best, learn

fast and dedicate myself to the A&F principles that stated "Imagine a

store that still treats you this way."

When Mr. Angstadt (we never called him Earle) walked around the

store, all of us felt his presence. We felt he was representing our

customers. When he greeted customers in any department, you could

feel and see how well they reacted to him. Mr. Angstadt was in my

department looking around one day and a customer went up to him and

said, "You must be the president of A&F." The customer commented on

his positive shopping experiences at A&F.

Mr. Angstadt asked all of us who worked at A&F for excellence, great

products and, most importantly, to give service that the customer

will never forget. He was so right. I was lucky to learn from him how

to use customer service as a marketing tool. He was a great role

model for me. I will miss him.

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