DMA's Net.Marketing Show Starts Slow but Picks Up

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SEATTLE -- The Direct Marketing Association's net.marketing spring conference started slowly yesterday with the big question still unanswered for many marketers: How many attendees are there?


DMA officials said numbers would not be released until tomorrow, but attendance at the day's pre-conference workshops was light.


However, things picked up during the afternoon's opening reception, where traffic on the exhibit floor was relatively busy on the show's opening day.


One of the morning workshops, Business to Business, E-Commerce, was canceled because only one person showed up. The other three sessions -- Marketing Strategy Development for the Web, Optimizing the Online Customer Experience and Maximizing Your E-Mail Marketing ROI -- had between 40 and 50 attendees each.


To combat the expected low attendance, the DMA is having a job fair during the show. It promoted the event with an ad in The Seattle Times on Sunday. "Submit your resume and/or business card at registration and we will send your resume to all qualified exhibitors and attendees," the ad read.


The DMA is charging only $50 for the three-day pass, which normally costs $225.


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