DMA Updates Fact Book

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The Direct Marketing Association released its 2002 Statistical Fact Book yesterday. It includes information about industry segments such as catalogs, interactive marketing, direct response advertising, lists and databases, direct mail and customer service.


The publication, in its 24th edition, contains more than 500 pages of data about the direct and interactive marketing industry. It includes more than 500 charts and 50 outside sources in addition to DMA studies.


Sample items include:


* The cost to send a direct mail piece to customers is 50 cents versus 5 cents for an e-mail.


* Business-to-business companies are more likely to achieve their highest response rates from compiled lists.


* Charity/fundraising direct mail was the most popular type of direct mail read.


* Japan and Germany have the highest direct marketing sales excluding the United States.


Print and downloadable versions, featuring hyperlinks to the Web sites of the companies that conducted the research, can be ordered through the DMA Bookstore Online at the-dma.org or by calling 301/604-0187. The book, in either print or online format, costs $150 for DMA members and $295 for non-members.


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