DigiMine Offers Wireless Analytics

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DigiMine Inc., Bellevue, WA, is expected to announce today that it has parlayed its Internet analytics services into a package for wireless marketers.


The hosted service reveals the number of people who view a piece of wireless content by week, day or hour. Statistics such as page views and average duration per visitor are also available.


Users can view which portion of their audience reads stock reports, horoscopes, sports or other content categories. The audience can be broken down by geography.


The reports can detail how often wireless users read e-mail messages from a marketer. They also can detail the type of wireless device being used, such as Nokia, Motorola or Ericsson.


DigiMine will store the data and segment it according to clients' marketing needs.


The wireless application is a spinoff of the company's Web analytics package, said Nick Besbeas, vice president and co-founder of DigiMine. Besbeas said the wireless consumer data can be used in e-mail, Web or direct mail marketing efforts.


"We've married various data sources and given clients a unified view of their world," he said. "They can get a read on the performance of not only their e-mail or online campaigns, but their offline campaigns [too]."


Marketers can expect to spend at least $20,000 to start using the service.


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