Decision Intelligence hires database marketing veteran Scott Spencer

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Decision Intelligence Inc., a consulting, analytics and database-marketing services company, has hired Scott Spencer as vice president and managing principal.

Spencer, who has an extensive background in database marketing and analytics, will serve as a consultant to Decision's clients.

He is an expert in customer contact optimization, customer segmentation and predictive modeling, and he will also play a key role in the development and implementation for the rollout of Decision Intelligence's new line of software products and on-demand services.

Spencer will play an important role in the company's "expansion in capabilities and offerings," said Bill Flach, CEO of Decision Intelligence Inc.

Spencer has more than 20 years of analytical marketing experience, serving in a variety of management and senior management positions.

Prior to joining Decision Intelligence, he served as the director of business intelligence for Land's End, an apparel company. There, Spencer led multiple analytical teams in statistical testing and predictive model development.

In addition, Spencer has also worked at Fingerhut, serving as a group and project manager overseeing business analysis and market research projects.

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