Constant Contact acquires CardStar

Share this article:
Gail Goodman
Gail Goodman

Email marketing company Constant Contact has acquired Boston-based mobile applications provider CardStar, Gail Goodman, CEO of Constant Contact, said Jan. 18.

The acquisition is designed to enable Waltham, Mass.-based Constant Contact to add a broader range of online marketing tools to its current portfolio of email marketing and social media tools. With CardStar's mobile capabilities, which enable consumers to consolidate membership and rewards cards on smartphones, Constant Contact aims to provide its small business clients with marketing tools that can reach consumers on-the-go and in real time.

“It's all about helping small businesses drive loyalty with their customers,” said Goodman. “CardStar has really mastered making loyalty card management simple for consumers. They made it easy for you to get your loyalty card numbers into the mobile phone.”

CardStar's employees joined the Constant Contact team in Waltham on Jan. 17, Goodman said. CardStar CEO and founder Andy Miller will serve as director of mobile products. He will report to Joel Hughes, Constant Contact's SVP of strategy and corporate development.

No layoffs will come as a result of the acquisition, Goodman said.

The acquisition closed on Jan. 13. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Share this article:

Sign up to our newsletters

Follow us on Twitter @dmnews

Latest Jobs:

More in Email Marketing

Email Opens Have Increased While Clicks Remain Static

Email Opens Have Increased While Clicks Remain Static

Open rates rose to 32.9% in Q1 2014, but clicks haven't changed for the past couple of years, a study says. But why?

Is Reliance on Email Stifling Lead Nurturing?

Is Reliance on Email Stifling Lead Nurturing?

Pressure to drive revenue has some B2B marketers looking to take a more multichannel approach to lead nurturing.

Blame Canada? CASL Leads to SPAM in the Short-Term

Blame Canada? CASL Leads to SPAM in the ...

In the email world, silence does not consent—at least not in Canada, where much fretted over anti-spam legislation went into effect on July 1.