Canada Enforces Tough Addressing Rules for Inbound Mail

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The U.S. Postal Service this week alerted customers mailing items to Canada that they must comply with strict Canadian customs and postal administration addressing requirements.


All postal items, except postcards, that do not display the complete name and address of both the sender and recipient -- in roman letters (A,B,C) and Arabic numerals (1,2,3) -- are being denied entry into Canada. Sender identification such as "Grandma" or recipient information such as "Resident," for example, are unacceptable and are among the causes of mail being returned. The alert reflects heightened security measures.


Addresses of Canadian recipients should be printed in ink or typewritten in capital letters. The last line of the address must show only the country name, written in full and in capital letters. When a Canadian postal delivery zone number is included in the address, mailing requirements allow that number to appear as the last line of the address.


Also, complete and legible customs declarations, along with required import documentation, must be provided to identify the contents of any package.


A backlog of incoming postal items containing incomplete or inaccurate information has been reported. According to Canadian officials, these items will be returned to their points of origin for correction by the sender as soon as practical.


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