Blame Canada? CASL Leads to SPAM in the Short-Term

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In the email world, silence does not consent—at least not in Canada, where much fretted over anti-spam legislation went into effect on July 1.



With Canada's Anti-Spam Law (CASL) officially on the books, the rules of consent couldn't be more draconian—and as a result, there's quite the Catch-22 going down right now on the email scene.

The law, stricter than CAN-SPAM in the U.S., places serious restrictions on the sending of electronic communications and states in no uncertain terms that marketers are required to get consent—or the consumer's inbox is off limits. While primarily centered on email, CASL also applies to text messages, Facebook messages, and other forms of social messaging sent in the service of selling.

Although consent can take several forms, either express or implied, some kind of opt-in is required or marketers will be found in violation, potentially leading to hugely onerous fines of up to $10 million—and whether we're talking Canadian dollars or American greenbacks, that's nothing to sniff at.

Agree with the law or not, CASL aims to protect the consumer—but in an effort to comply and reduce spam in the long-term, marketers are sending enough opt-in requests to drown a fish.  

And the irony was not lost on the Twittersphere.

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