Ask.com extends relationship with LookSmart

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LookSmart has extended its license of LookSmart's AdCenter for Publishers through 2009 with search engine Ask.com.

Ask.com controls LookSmart's AdCenter as a component of its Ask Sponsored Listings pay-per-click advertising program.

"Extending the relationship was just plain old smart business," said Dave Hills, CEO of LookSmart, San Francisco. "The fact that Ask chose to extend is great validation for us and our service."

Ask Sponsored Listings (ASL) is an automated open-auction system that lets search marketers purchase, manage and optimize campaigns on Ask.com and its publisher network.

ASL is available through its parent company IAC Advertising Solutions. ASL processes more than 5 billion queries monthly and supports over 30,000 advertisers bidding on more than 10 million keywords.

LookSmart's AdCenter for Publishers is designed for all types of online media companies, providing an auction platform, algorithmic ad server and a reporting engine.

"The AdCenter provides Ask.com a solid platform to grow and service its advertiser base and revenue in a cost-effective manner," Mr. Hills said. "It also offers detailed reporting for both the publisher and the advertiser."

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