Ask Jeeves Starts TV Ads

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Search engine Ask Jeeves is expected to announce an ad campaign today that features six television commercials. This is Ask Jeeves' first TV buy in four years.


The campaign, created by TBWAChiatDay San Francisco, aims to show the "next step" in the Oakland, CA, company's marketing and will include related Internet and print advertising. The 15-second TV spots will appear in rotation on national cable, primetime and syndicated television and feature the tagline: "Ask Jeeves. And get what you're searching for."


"Over the past three years, we have significantly improved the Ask Jeeves search experience with better relevancy, direct answers to search queries, local search results and personalization," said Greg Ott, Ask Jeeves vice president of marketing. "Our marketing campaign emphasizes that Ask Jeeves is great for all kinds of Web search. The Ask Jeeves television advertisements will increase brand awareness, drive users to the site and positively impact consumers' impressions of the brand."


In each commercial, someone is seeking information from an expert, but on a topic that person is not an authority on and, therefore, can't answer. The spots conclude with the suggestion to search Ask Jeeves, as it is a more authoritative source than the so-called experts.


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