Architectural Digest Distributes Discs Via B&N Stores

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Condé Nast Publications' Architectural Digest struck an exclusive deal with bookseller Barnes & Noble Inc. to distribute 20,000 CD-ROMs polybagged with its February issue.


The interactive CD, "The Architectural Digest Guide to Home Design," offers design tips and ideas linked to the latest home furnishings from a select group of Architectural Digest advertisers.


Categories include art, bath, building products and flooring, carpets and rugs, fabrics, furniture, kitchen and electronics and lighting. Advertisers include Brunschwig & Fils, Ralph Lauren Home, Baker, Ligne Rosset, Kohler, Waterworks, Karastan and the Fine Art Dealers Association.


The CD-ROM features images and details about the products featured, with links to the manufacturers' Web sites. Participating advertisers receive one polybagged issue with five CD-ROMs.


The CD-ROMs are polybagged as a bonus for copies sold in 655 Barnes & Noble bookstores nationwide. Three-tier standalone display units were created for the issue as a point-of-sale promotion in the stores' house and home section. Another 5,000 CD-ROMs are earmarked for distribution at Architectural Digest events and promotions.


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